Wednesday, October 10, 2012

A Quilt As You Go Tutorial : :

Today I'm finally sharing a little Quilt-As-You-Go how-to! This is definitely one of my most favorite things to do! I'm super excited to be sharing my process, and even more so now that I'm sharing today as part of the Scrappy Stash Quilt-Along blog hop!

Yesterday, Jennifer kicked off the Scrappy Stash Quilt-Along by sharing a tutorial for making monochromatic improv log cabin blocks. You can read about all the quilt-along details, guidelines, timeline info, and wonderful prizes in her post.  And now, it's my turn to share my method of quilting-as-i-go...

Let's get started!!

A Quilt As You Go Tutorial

What you'll need : :
  • Finished quilt blocks, in your desired size and pattern
  • Cotton batting (My new go-to batting is Nature's Touch Cotton Batting by Pellon)
  • Basting pins or spray
  • Coordinating Thread
  • Rotary Cutter/Mat/Ruler

* Notes * 
  • Synthetic batting is not suggested, I only use a natural batting. It is important to be able to press the batting with a hot iron and steam. 
  • Low-loft batting is preferred.
  • Quilt blocks can be made in any pattern and size..
  • Have fun with your quilting, this is the perfect time to experiment with new stitches or fmq!
  • This method does not include the quilt backing fabric. I like to add my quilt backing at the end, to avoid hand-sewing, which is really hard on my hands.

Quilting the Quilt Blocks : :

1. Make the amount of quilt blocks needed to create your quilt. For today's tutorial, I am using improv pieced quilt blocks, each measuring 12.5"

Quilt Blocks 2

2.  Cut or use a scrap piece of batting measuring at least 1" more on all four sides, than the size quilt block you are quilting. 3. Center the quilt block onto the piece of batting. 4. Use basting pins or spray to baste the quilt block to the piece of batting

1,2,3

5. Add the quilting stitches, removing pins as you go. For my blocks, I quilted with straight lines, using the edge of my presser foot as my spacing guide. If needed, you can mark where you want the quilting lines with a disappearing ink pen before hand. I like to be more improv and free with this type of quilting. I often change directions and make up the quilting pattern as I go.

5

6. Continue until the quilting is finished.

Quilted lines - finished

7. Repeat with the rest of the quilt blocks.

Quilted Blocks

Trimming the Quilted Blocks : :

8. Using a rotary cutter, ruler, and cutting mat, square up the quilted quilt block by trimming away the excess batting.

8

9. Repeat with the rest of the quilt blocks.

quilting -- continue squaring up

I've always loved the way these quilt-as-you-go blocks look on the batting side!

quilting -- finished back 
Joining the Quilted Blocks : :

10. Place two quilted quilt blocks right sides together, matching up all ends and pin in place. Sew together on one side using a 1/2" seam allowance.

10

11. Using a very hot iron with steam, press the back seams open 12. Clip the bottom corners slightly like pictured below -- this will help to prevent bulky seams.

11, 12

13. Continue sewing together the quilted quilt blocks, pressing all seams open as you go.

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14. Press the quilt top front as you go, as well.

quilting as you go -- press top

So simple and fun, right?! I'm going to continue quilting away on my blocks, and when it comes time for finishing the quilt -- I simply baste the finished quilted quilt top to my backing fabric and stitch in the ditch, sewing along each seam where my blocks have been joined. This creates a square pattern for the backside of the finished quilt. Use your go-to binding method to finish. And, Voila! Your QAYG quilt is finished!!

I can't wait to finish mine! Of course I plan to share it here, along with all the details needed for finishing a quilt-as-you-go quilt, just as soon as I do!

UPDATE : : Instruction and photos of my finished QAYG Quilt can be found HERE or by clicking the photo below! Thanks!!!

QAYG Quilt

I hope you enjoy my qayg tutorial today, that you find it helpful, and consider using it for your own Scrappy Stash Quilt!! If you do give this tutorial a go at anytime, be sure to share on my Facebook page or in my Maureen Cracknell Handmade Flickr groupMaureen 

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157 comments:

  1. This is a new technique for me! I'll have to try it! I think it will be a good way to take on a free motion design without overwhelming myself with a huge quilt.

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    1. Good idea! I am at the point where I want to stipple but afraid to take on a big project while perfecting my motion.

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  2. Great tutorial Maureen! I do have to say that straight line quilting is my favorite ~ so clean and simple.

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  3. I have to try this technique, lovely design.

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  4. I have been wanting to do this technique for such a long time and you made it look so easy.

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  5. Perfect tutorial - thank you so much! I've wanted to try this for a while and was never quite sure how to make it work!

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  6. I much prefer straight lines over the panto all over swirly designs that do not go with the quilt block patters. I have never tried this method that you show and would like to see the back when you are finished with it.

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  7. I really love the way your quilt is coming together, the fabrics are very pretty!! =D

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  8. How fun! I was wondering how you ended up quilting it to the backing...thanks for sharing. Now as soon as I finish my 'must finish' sewing, I will have to give this a try :)

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  9. This is a great tutorial! And those owl scissors are awesome :)

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    1. I LOVE my Owl Scissors! :) They are from the Workroom here -- http://shop.theworkroom.ca/product/kelmscott-designs-owl-scissors

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  10. This is pretty awesome, thanks! I had always wondered how you were supposed to join the QAYG blocks together, and how to add the backing.

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  11. Great idea, thanks for sharing Maureen! I never thought of QAYG without the backing fabric...

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  12. this is the first time I have seen a tute where you do the backing as one piece. i think I may have to do this sometime.

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  13. Actually, would you mind if I featured your tutorial sometime during my "31 days of quilting with your walking foot" series?
    http://blog.petitdesignco.com/

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  14. Thanks so much for this tutorial, I've always wanted to try a quilt as you go. Wish me luck!!

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  15. This is genius - I've always been a bit frightened of the actual quilting part of quilting (as it were), but this makes it all look possible.

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  16. A fabulous tutorial. Thank you so much for sharing this with us. :)

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  17. Ms Maureen, Good morning and Happy Wednesday!!! As usual, your precision stitching and pressing are the reasons I enjoy all that you do. You continue to in spire us in all you do!!! Hugs, Cyndy

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  18. Hey Maureen! Great tutorial!! Quick question, I know with batting you need to stitch within 8-10" (depending on the batting) so it holds up to wear and tear, but what about the backing? Does the space between the seams of the blocks hold up over time or does it wear easily because its not stitched to the batting and top?

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    1. Hi Jayme!! I used this method a few times now and have never had a problem. My best example is this quilt -- http://maureencracknellhandmade.blogspot.com/2012/05/my-bottled-rainbows-quilt.html For it, I stitched around each colored block, to quilt it to the backing fabric and it looks great from both sides. These blocks are really large, too! For the quilt wip I shared today in the example, the quilting pattern on the backing fabric will end up be 11.5" squares. Of course, if you are making smaller blocks, they will be smaller yet.

      Does that make sense?? :) I hope so!! LOL

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  19. This is a great idea for beginners (like me!).

    I've also heard you can combine the backing and binding steps by rolling the backing fabric up and over the top and sewing it down. (very cheaty!). I may have to combine these two ideas for my first quilt.

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    1. I love doing that!! LOL I did that for this quilt. http://maureencracknellhandmade.blogspot.com/2012/05/my-bottled-rainbows-quilt.html

      I love making binding, I just don't like adding it to a quilt. :) I still consider myself a VERY amateur quilter, so I am ALL about simplifying the process anyway I can! Hopefully one day I'll have more time, patience, energy, and strength in my hands to perfectly hand-stitch my quilt binding. But, that's probably not likely! ;)

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  20. This tutorial is great. I follow a few other quilt as you go quilters and their blogs as well. I have a question though - this style of quilting seems super conducive to improv/mod blocks but I am having a hard time picturing some other quilt patterns quilted this way. Are there any other patterns (maybe more traditional piecing) you have seen QAYG that have stood out to you? Thanks again and happy sewing!
    -k

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  21. I remember making one of thses years ago, however, I wasn't taught that nice way to bind the quilt. I had to make it up. I have bookmarked your page for when I try this kind again.

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  22. Oh please, please do hurry and show us how to finish this project :)

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    1. I'm really going to try for next week! I have to clean my sewing room today before I do anything else -- it is SO bad! ;) Then, I really hope to get it finished. Be sure to stay tuned.... and, THANK YOU!!

      xx, Maureen

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    2. Ha ha, I'm still waiting to see the ending to this project...did I mention patiently waiting :)

      BTW, congratulations on your new home.

      Debbie

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  23. Excellent tutorial Maureen! Thanks so much~~I have the done QAG but with the backing too, and do not like how it looks when it is finished. Will definitely try your method as it seems much easier! Also~~great idea to use all natural batting~~that is all I ever use!

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  24. I love this! Just yesterday I finished my bottled rainbows quilt.

    Since discovering QAYG, I've been a bit obsessed. I just LOVE it! I made a QAYG kitchen mat and I have started making some QAYG log cabin blocks. I just love the straight quilting lines!

    Here is my mat if you want to take a peek:
    http://melissalovescolor.blogspot.com/2012/10/kitchen-mat-quilt-as-you-go.html

    Geez, am I allowed to post a link to my blog in the comments section of your blog? I hope that doesn't go against blogging etiquette!

    Can't wait to see your finished project!

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    1. OF COURSE, Melissa!!! I love it when people share! If I could figure out the whole linky-thing, I would love to host some sort of show & tell here!

      Off to check out that mat! :)

      p.s. You're a no-reply commenter, did you know??

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    2. Oh, good! Glad I didn't break any blogging rules. ;)

      How fun would a show & tell be!!

      I have no idea how to not be a no-reply commenter. Do you know? Maybe I need to check my Google or Blogger settings.

      Thanks! :)

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    3. Yes!! Read this -- http://www.pleasant-home.com/2010/12/so-exciting-less-no-reply-bloggers.html

      :) M

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  25. Thanks for a fab tutorial, Maureen!

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  26. Timely tutorial, Maureen! I've been thinking about trying some qayg on a couple blocks but wasn't sure the best way to join them. Thanks for the great instructions

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  27. Great job on the tutorial, Maureen! I'm going to try this method when I'm finally finished with the back log of sewing on the table!

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  28. This technique is new to me and so much neater than having the backing QAUG.
    This is a definite try me and I plan on doing so.
    Thank you Maureen

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  29. Thanks for sharing this. I've heard of quilting as you go, but I didn't really understand the process. Perfect timing too.

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  30. This is the cleanest/neatest method I've seen Maureen! :) I'm going to try this when I finish my quilt I'm working on. I might be able to crank you some quilts by the Xmas deadline this way. lol

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  31. I so enjoy your blog. Thanks for this idea. I guess I'm just stumped how the seams are bulkly with the batting/fabric joined to the batting/fabric? Maybe pressing the seams open relieves the bulk. Thanks again!

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    1. That was my question/comment as well.
      Doesnt the batting tend to make small ridges along the seam line?

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  32. I love your blog so much. You have the cutest things and the best ideas. I actually made 3 of your fat quarter aprons for gifts for Christams this year. Love them so much. Thanks for sharing this. I see so many people doing the Weekender Bag in this style and now I have a better idea of how to quilt it all (if I ever want to try that way). Thanks!

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  33. This is really well done and it actually make quilting look easy and doable for someone like me!lol Thanks for that!

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  34. Hmmm, this is very interesting. I couldn't imagine how those seams would turn out joining the blocks, but it makes sense! This seams very doable-thanks for sharing!

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  35. Thank you!! I always dread the actual quilting of my quilts -- so lately I have been quilting by credit card (hiring a longarm quilter), which gets expensive. I think I could do this! Thanks again!

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  36. Thanks for the beautifully-written tutorial, Maureen! I think this is the only way I could possibly make an actual quilt (as opposed to something small, like a tote). You're the best!

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  37. wow! i am just learning to quilt and it overwhelms me. your tutorial is awesome and i think i can do this. thank you.

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  38. I've not tried this method yet but would like to give it a go. If you press the block seams open and then stitch in the ditch to attach the backing doesn't this create a problem because you are essentially stitching right down the open seam line?

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    1. Hi Anne! I responded to you via email, but I want to share some links to quilts I've made using this method here for others who may be wondering the same thing.

      -- http://maureencracknellhandmade.blogspot.com/2012/05/patchwork-baby-quilt.html

      -- http://maureencracknellhandmade.blogspot.com/2012/05/my-bottled-rainbows-quilt.html

      -- http://maureencracknellhandmade.blogspot.com/2012/05/scrappy-improv-quilt.html

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    2. For a real hard working quilt you could do a 3/4" Echo (to avoid the seams) on each side of the seam line instead of SITD.

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    3. That would be perfect for adding the backing too! If this quilt ends up being larger than I am planning (they usually do :) I may do that instead! I'm hoping to go work on more blocks in a little bit! QAYG is definitely addicting!! :)

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    4. LOL all things involving sewing, quilting, embroidery are addicting! I can always get in trouble with the budget on supplies. :)

      I'm in love with that floral print in your blocks, do you remember who it's by?

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    5. It's from the Lilly Belle collection by Bari J. for Art Gallery Fabrics. It's so pretty!!

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  39. Great idea, and a little different from the other ones I've read, so it's great to get your process: the finishing looks easier and quicker. I'm going to give it a try!! Thanks :-D

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  40. What a wonderful tutorial. Thank you so much. Can't wait to see how you finish it with the backing. My maths brain just can't work it out. Would you mind if I shared it on my blog please?
    Love
    Patti xxx

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  41. Wow I totally agree for FMQ fancier designs - my garment sewing machine is making it very difficult to sew in the middle of larger quilts, this will make it so much more managable! (and truth I dont necessarily want fancy FMQ designs on the back of my quilts!)

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  42. A great idea and a good way to hide any quilting mishaps. It is a shame to loose the quilting on the batting though...=D

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  43. Great tutorial, definitely going to try this for the scrap a-long!

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  44. This looks great. Is it possible to see the back of the quilt as I am a liitle confused (still new) I put binding and hand baste the edging of my quilts do you mean to do this on the back of the quilt over the seams? i am excited at the prospect of trying this one!!!

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  45. Love the blocks you've used for this, I always wondered how QAYG worked!

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  46. Great tutorial. Thanks for sharing.

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  47. Gorgeous as usual, Maureen! I really love how you pulled the colors from the central print to guide your fabric choices. This is going to be a great quilt! Hope you're having a happy day :)

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  48. That's it?!?! I can't believe how simple that is! Thank you!

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  49. Maureen I love the look of the straingt line quilting. I made a quilt for my granddaughter & quilted the border that way. It just gave it a special look. Thanks for sharing.

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  50. I love the colors and the design of your blocks. Love your quilting technique too. I have to try this. Thank you for sharing.

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  51. What a fun way to create a pretty quilt...thanks for the great tutorial!!

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  52. I plan to try this tutorial for my first quilt and I am really interested in these fabrics. They are so pretty and sweet! Can you tell me where to get them?

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    1. It was a custom bundle I had put together for Pink Castle Fabrics, called Sweet Summer Dreams. It is no longer available, the main floral is Bari J's LillyBelle Collection for Art Gallery Fabrics, and the rest are cool blues, yellows, and corals that coordinate with that! :)

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  53. Love this!!!!!!!!! Thank you for sharing!

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  54. This is wonderful and so are you! Thank you!!

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  55. I am VERY new to quilting and just finding my way. When you get to the backing part, could you show a couple of pics for us newbies?? Thanks, Gayle

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  56. Doesn't sewing on all of that batting gunk up your machine? I have seen these tutorials before, but I know how fuzzy my machine looks after regular quilting, and I find this scary!

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    1. I have never had that problem and I have done this quite a bit! I also sew with a wool blend felt very often and don't ever have a problem. Maybe a little more lint to clean out every now and again, but nothing too terrible. :)

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  57. Thank you for this tutorial. It makes quilt as you go look so simple. I always seem to make things harder than they need to be. I am going to try it on my next bag. Thank you!

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  58. SO helpful and clear pics too that I could really understand!
    THANK you so much!

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  59. Love this :) thank you so much for sharing

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  60. I love this tutorial I can't wait to try something. I just went thru all your tutorials you are one talented young lady. I can't wait to see what you do next, thanks for sharing your talent with us.

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    1. THANK YOU!!! I really LOVE to sew and I hope that shows! :)

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  61. I have only seen QAYG done with all three layers at once so you can see the quilting on front and back. This looks quite interesting and I may have to give it a try. Thanks for sharing :)

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  62. This is the first time I've seen QAYG with the backing in one piece. It would be a good idea for my FMQ practice blocks. Thanks for the inspiration!

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  63. I love this Maureen, thanks!
    I am concerned that the seams would be oddly bulky.... are they? I imagine them stiff too.... Would really appreciate your reply.

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  64. I love this! I have a "shop hop" quilt that is going to be something like a king sized quilt when it is done, and I wonderful if this might be the easiest way to finish it off instead of quilting it all when I am done. Thank you!

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  65. Brilliant, I have a large quilt to make and was really worried about the finished size abs quilting it. Now I have a solution. Great instructions, thank you.

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  66. I was also concerned about bulky seams. I am just finishing the blocks for a double quilt and am considering this method as I have a domestic machine with a small throat.

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  67. Thanks for sharing a fantastic tutorial! One question though - once I've got the blocks all pieced together, do I need to quilt in the ditch to hold the backing fabric to the quilted top piece? Would appreciate the advice, thanks!

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  68. I'm so glad to see these happy blocks again!! And yes, QAYG is super fun, I think. Man, I forgot how much I love this stack of fabrics!

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  69. This is a fabulous tuto and technique... thanks for sharing!

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  70. Hey WOW this is amazing. I always wondered if there was something like this out there. I had no idea! Amazing!

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  71. Thank you.Fabulous tutorial and I have added it to my favorites.

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  72. Still oneswaiting to try a jelly roll...especially the ones in my closet.

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  73. I love this idea!! I am going to use the QAYG method to make all of my Christmas gifts!! Your work is beautiful! Thank you for sharing!

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  74. I arrived to your blog thanks to Petit Design Co. Love this idea! And love your quilt!

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  75. Also visiting from Petit Design Co. :) I have used QAYG once before,it did work great,but I didn't really like the strips of fabric outlining every block. Your method will give a much better over all appearance to the finished quilt top! Going to try this on my next quilt,thanks for sharing :)

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  76. Thanks Maureen; I always wondered how this was done.

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  77. I am very new at this "quilting thing" and think
    your idea is fabulous. I have a small quilt to quilt and wonder about it fitting under my machine. I will pin this tutorial and use it one day. Thanks so much.

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  78. Love this idea. I am going to give it a try. Really appreciate the clear instructions!!

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  79. Found you this week with the Sew, Mama, Sew giveaway and bookmarked this page for future reference. It looks interesting. :-) Thanks for the work you put into it.

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  80. Your tutorial has helped me understand this concept so well. I have read many pages on it but never fully understood. Now thanks to you I can try this method.

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  81. I love this idea, but I am confused how you quilt the back once you have added the back fabric. Do you not quilt it?

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  82. what a good idea, I have wanted to quilt this way as I get tired of trying to wrestle with a large quilt in the machine...will try this, thanks!

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  83. I love your idea of not putting on the backing fabric until complete. I have only seen that done with backing and them you have to put some kind of "cover" over the seams. I wan't to try quilt as you go on my daughter's quilt but she didn't like the idea now I have a new vision thanks to you and I am ready to finish the quilt. Thanks for your ideas, your inspiring.

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  84. wow looks so good to me
    Thanks a million beginer

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  85. I'm so glad you posted the tutorial on the QAYG method. I was wondering how you sewed the blocks together. And stitching in the ditch is an awesome idea for putting the backing on. I'm totally going to do this!

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  86. Great tutorial! Thank you! I have recently started doing more free motion quilting but the thought of a bigger piece is very overwhelming, this is a great way to do that without the bulk of the whole quilt! I love your blog.

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  87. WOW! It does sound simple and something worth trying. I need to get some blocks made and try this lovely technique. By the time I am responding I am hoping there is a post for the finished quilt.
    thanks, I am looking forward to hang out with you gals.

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  88. I've wanted to try QAYG but I wasn't looking forward to hand binding the seams of each block on the back of the quilt. But with your technique, I don't have to worry about it. Awesome tutorial. I'm going to try this.

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  89. I'm so excited to finally see the QAYG explained so simply! It's the perfect technique for living in a small apartment.

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    1. I just got a brain storm to use this method when using machine embroidery for the quilt lines. Thanks Maureen, you just upped my creativity up a big notch!

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    2. I love your idea!! Be sure to send me some pics!!

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  90. I really wish I had rad this before I stitched my queen size quilt together. I'm going to be doing it this way from now on!

    Carla
    Grand Forks, ND

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  91. How thick are the seams between the joined blocks? In terms of thickness, are these seams noticeable?

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  92. Hi

    Your quilt is absolutely beautiful.

    I'm thinking about trying this technique out on a quilt I'm currently working on but I'm a little concerned that my sewing machine will end up full of fluff. How do you avoid that when there is nothing between the batting and the machine?

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  93. Love this method...can't wait to try it out!!!

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  94. If you sew 1/2" seam to put the blocks together you can only do this with blocks that don't have "points" or a pattern that matches up at 1/4". Do you need the 1/2" seam or do you think you could get by with 1/4"?

    thanks

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    1. You can get away with a 1/4 seam for sure! Since this is a new idea for some of you, I'm suggesting a 1/2" seam to make sure the batting presses open nicely at the seams, but this will work with a 1/4" seam, as well!

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    2. I was just wondering this too! Thanks! Can't wait to try it!

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  95. Maureen, love your tutorial and can't wait to try it! Excellent photography and instructions.

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  96. So I am thinking of trying this on my next quilt. I just finished the blocks. My question is, how is the drape on the finished quilt? I'd love to give it a shot and I love the look of dense quilting, but not the stiffness. I think since this is dense on the front but loose on the back, maybe it's the perfect compromise for me.

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  97. Beautiful. Love your stuff!You are my inspiration :)
    http://nicholeannhandmade.blogspot.com/

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  98. I may have already commented on this, but going to again :) Thanks so much for this. I really want to practice free motion and this will be perfect! I tried once, but it wasn't so good (at all, lol). I tried on a small piece and it actually looked pretty great, so I will give this a shot, thanks again!

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  99. Thank you so much for this tutorial. I was completely daunted by the prospect of making a bigger project until I saw how you do it. Have now made my first grown up quilt.
    http://beardingandscrim.wordpress.com/2013/04/14/my-first-full-size-quilt/

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  100. very helpful! do you have a tutorial for how to add the backing as well? thanks!

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  101. I'm curious how you attach the backing after the front has already been quilted to the batting?

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  102. I am so glad to have seen this on Facebook!!! I've wanted to know how to "quilt as you go" for years! Thank you so much!!!
    Sue

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  103. Hi Maureen! I was wondering, do you think I can follow this tutorial using voile? Id really appreciate your opinion on this! Thanks a lot!

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  104. Great tutorial. Is there a tutorial for the blocks? I love the scrappy-ness.

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    1. Thank you Jan, no tutorial for the scrappy blocks YET!! :)

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  105. This looks so easy Maureen! I'm wondering though, about sashing and borders. I would like to add sashing in between my blocks. Can I sew the sashing to one block and then quilt that block? Adding sashing only to the blocks that need it...i.e on one side? Then adding borders to the sides wouldn't be so bad because you only need to put that part under the machine, not the whole quilt. Did you add borders?

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  106. Hi Maureen, I'm trying this for the first time and am finding that the fabric "puckers" a bit especially as you near the center. I'm trying the pattern you did on these blocks using presser foot as guide so about 1/4" between rows. It seems to pull/stretch the fabric (100% cotton quilt fabric). I trim the blocks up and it looks better but I was wondering if I was doing something wrong. Do you use a longer stitch length? I'm using a walking foot and I also tried it with the standard foot. I'm making this as a wedding gift so I'm trying to make this just right. Thanks for any suggestions you may have ;c) Janet

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    1. Hi Janet, I had no problems like you are experiencing. Are you basting? I usually have my stitch length set at 2.5 - 2.8. Are you using a 100% cotton or natural fiber batting?

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  107. hi Maureen! Just wanted to say thanks so much for this tutorial! I just quilted a huge quilt and was able to do it all on my little janome!
    Jessica

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  108. Hi Maureen, just wanted to say thank you for posting this method. I've been hoping to give it a try, and now have two perfect projects to try it on. The actual quilting part (on a regular machine) is my biggest challenge when making quilts. : )

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  109. i love this quilt!! I'm definitely going to try it when you post a tutorial! I wanted to suggest that you post a picture of the back of the quilt. I've been curious about how the backs of your quilt as you go quilts look like.

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  110. Lying in bed this morning I was wrestling with an idea for quilting a large-ish quilt that I have coming up. I want to quilt the center one way and the borders another. Wondering how you added your borders to this QAYG quilt. Your answer may help my brain rest a bit. ;)

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  111. I just found this. I have seen other QAYG methods where you add the batting to your blocks as you quilt them, and haven't loved the looks of that approach. I'm excited to give this a try, and it makes me much less afraid to begin learning FMQ!

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  112. This post might have just changed my quilting life. I have to try it with the next quilt I make. Can't wait!!

    Kristin

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  113. Great tutorial.... I just started learning free motion quilting. This will be a great method for that. Mainly because I would rather toss just one square if i mes it up as opposed to whole a quilt. Not to mention how much easier it will make moving around on it.Thank you so much for sharing this.

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  114. Hi! Thank you so much for taking the time to share your method for qayg. I think your way is the best one I have found. I am relatively new to quilting and want to make an improv quilt with a solid color backing, do it QAYG and try free motion quilting on it. So many new techniques for me! I have my fabrics and have been searching for how to do what I want to do, and thanks to you, I think I'm ready to start sewing! Thank you!

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  115. I am SOOOO glad I found this. I am working on a paper pieced quilt for my mom for Christmas (yes, it's late) and was nervous about quilting it myself (I usually send mine out) and especially with a minky backing. This method will be PERFECT!

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  116. Hi Maureen! I have a QUESTION... (I just took a QYAG bag class on Craftsy & loved it! I'm now making a quilt for my mom in law & am going to use your method!) So my question is - did you do your borders as a qyag too?? & if so did you do them as long rectangular pieces in between your setting squares in the corners? Or did you do lots of squares to make the border? Or did you somehow add the borders when you added the back?? Thanks in advance for any specifics on that! p.s. just stumbled upon your site last month & love it! :)

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  117. Love your method of QAYG. It just makes sense! Next project I need to give this a try. My littke "beginner" Janome has a small throat and baby quilts are all I can manage. This will work!

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  118. Wow. I've never heard of this method before. I think you just refueled my quilting fire!

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  119. Great easy to understand tutorial, can't wait to try this. ☺

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  120. Hi Maureen. I was wondering if you typically join your finished blocks with a 1/4" seam or a 1/2" seam? I just noticed your typography tutorial used a 1/4" and I want to give this method a try! Maybe it doesn't matter? Yours all look awesome, so I was just curious before I give it a whirl :)

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  121. Thank You so much for such a nicely written Tutorial on "Quilt as You Go", it is the Refresher course I so badly needed!! Can't Thank You Enough!! zerlene woodward

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  122. Hi. I'm new to quilting and am working now on blocks for my third quilt. I have been planning to use a qayg method, but it's one that quilts all three layers at once, backing included. I'd rather do it with your method. I'm wondering if you ladies who have used the three layers at once method would post pictures and comments about the ones you've made. Also, if some of you have tried Maureen's method could you post pictures of the finished quilt? Thanks! p.s. using this method, when you say to baste the backing to the quilted front, does that mean an all-over basting such as pinning or spray? Or just the edges of the quilt, at say 1/2" from the outer edge all the way around?

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  123. Another question I have is this, when attaching the backing using basting of some sort to hold the layers together while quilting the sitd lines, does that not defeat the purpose of qayg? I mean, if I have to put the whole quilt in the throat of my machine to add the backing, why don't I just quilt it normal fashion since both ways end up in the throat of my machine? I hope that made sense, lol. Did I miss something in the directions?

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