Monday, September 30, 2013

A Herringbone Quilt Tutorial : :

A Herringbone Quilt Tutorial

This project tutorial is a Quilt-As-You-Go style quilt, made with long panels rather than traditional "blocks". We'll be using cotton batting as our foundation for easy string quilt piecing, making this the perfect project to use up those fabric strip scraps. I think you'll be very surprised with just how simple and quickly this quilt comes together. This is definitely one of my new, most favorite styles of quilting!

Fabric and Materials Required : :
  • a variety of fabrics cut into 2.5" x  14.5" ( I used all Anna Maria Horner fabrics from several of her collections. Using around 210 strips for all of my panels + extra for my scrappy binding)
  • 8 -- panels of 100% cotton batting measuring 8" x 64"
  • thread & sewing pins
  • fabrics for the quilt backing and binding
  • rotary cutter/large cutting mat/ruler set
  • pencil or pen for marking

* Notes * 
  • Synthetic batting is NOT suggested, I only use a 100% cotton natural batting. It is important to be able to press the batting with a hot iron and steam. For those of you in countries other than the U.S, please make sure you use a 100% cotton needle punched batting (a reader in India pointed this out to me).
  • Use a Low-loft batting. The #1 question I receive about QAYG is folks wanting to know if the seams are bulky. My answer is NO, not to a noticeable degree. I absolutely wouldn't spend my sewing time making a quilt that was poorly constructed or that wasn't comfortable!
  • Quilt panels can be made in any size! The measurements I'm sharing for this tutorial makes a 62" square finished quilt. Please feel free to adjust that to your own desired length and width. I plan to make my next one much bigger!!
  • This method does not include the quilt backing fabric. I like to add my quilt backing at the end, to avoid hand-sewing, which is really hard on my hands

Now, let's get started!! 

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Making the Batting Panels  : :

1. To make the batting panels for the foundation string piecing, cut 8 - batting strips measuring 8" x 64".

1 cut batting step

2. Place one batting panel on the cutting mat at a time, matching one of the long edges to the diagonal grid on the mat, with the fuzzier side up. (the batting I use, Nature's Touch, has a noticeable softer side. This is the side I consider the front side)

2. Place batting panel at a diaginal

3. Keeping the batting at a diagonal, use the ruler and square grid on the mat to mark lines every two inches or so going across the batting panel. I did this for the first 10" - 14" to help keep the proper angel when adding my first several fabric strings. Once those first fabrics are added, you'll keep that angel naturally as you piece

3. Mark grid lines

4. Repeat this step making sure you mark FOUR batting panels with lines running one way, and FOUR with lines marked in the opposite direction. This will create the herringbone pattern once the fabric strings are added and the panels are sewn together

4. Mark the panels

Adding the Fabric Strings : :

5.  Prepare the fabric strings by cutting fabrics into 2.5" strips. For this quilt I used approximately 210 strips measuring 2.5" x 14.5" with a few measuring a little less in length for the beginning and end of my panels where that much length isn't necessary

AMH Strings 
6. Using that first mark as your guide, begin by sewing that first fabric right side down onto the batting, using a 1/4" seam allowance along the raw edge. Since you're sewing the fabrics to the batting as your foundation, you'll be permanently setting the fabric strings in place.

5. Adding the first fabric

7. Fold over the fabric strip and either press with iron or you can simply smooth it down flat with your hand. The fabrics stick nicely to the batting, so I was comfortable carefully folding over the fabric strings, smoothing them as I went. Continue adding fabric strings, placing each new fabric string on top of the other, with right sides facing, matching up the raw edges. Attach with 1/4" seam, fold over, and continue to press or smooth each new fabric added

6. Adding fabric strings

7. Continue, work your way down the panel

8. When finished with a panel, press both sides well. Use a mat, ruler, and rotary cutter to trim away the overhang of fabric from each side of the panels and square up if needed. Repeat until all 8 panels are finished.

8. Press and trim panels

Finished Panel

Sewing Panels Together : :

9. Take two panels with strings pieced in opposite directions and place them right sides together. Use sewing pins to secure their place and sew along one side keeping a 1/4" seam allowance. Repeat this with the remaining panels to create FOUR herringbone fabric panels

9 Sew Panels together to create the herringbone

10. Press the seams on the back open and the front side of each panel well

10. Press Seams OpenAdd Quilting Stitches : :

11. Now that your FOUR herringbone panels are finished, use a thread of your choice to add quilting stitches every few strings, pivoting at the center of each herringbone panel to form a "V" shaped stitch line. Continue this down the length of each panel

11. Add quilting stitches every few strips

Quilt Stitches

Sewing the Herringbone Panels Together : :

12. Using a 1/4" seam, sew all FOUR herringbone panels together

12. Sew Herringbone panels together

13. Press all seams open and the quilt top front, as well. If needed, square up the quilted quilt top. After squaring, my quilt top measured approximately a 62" square

13. press all seams open, press quilt top, and sqaure up if needed


Quilt Backing, Basting, & Binding : :

14. Piece together fabrics for the quilt back to measure at least 2" bigger than the quilt top on all sides and baste it to the quilted quilt front.  I use Therm O Web's SpraynBond basting spray for this, however pin basting works

Quilt Basting

15. Working your way down from the top of the quilt to the bottom, with a quilt stitch length set at a 2.5 or more if you prefer, simply sew about 1/4" from the seam lines (when adding this stitching it IS recommended that you do use a Walking Foot). Continue this on both sides of each seam running from the top of the quilt to the bottom.

15. Sew on quilt backing

Final Quilting

Below shows a close up look of what these stitches will look like from both the front and the back side of the quilt

Close up -- Front

Close up -- Back

16. Bind the quilt using your preferred method, any leftover 2.5" strips makes for some fabulous scrappy binding!

AMH Scrappy Binding

Voila! Your Herringbone Quilt is finished!!

An Autumn Herringbone Quilt // Maureen Cracknell Handmade

An Autumn Herringbone Quilt // Maureen Cracknell Handmade

An Autumn Herringbone Quilt // Maureen Cracknell Handmade

An Autumn Herringbone Quilt // Maureen Cracknell Handmade

Thank you so much for stopping by today and for all the love you've already shown this quilt here, on Instagram, on Facebook, and on Flickr! I really hope you enjoy this tutorial!

Do you think you'll give it a try

If you do, please be sure to share on my Facebook page or in my Maureen Cracknell Handmade Flickr group 

  Maureen

161 comments:

  1. Thank you Maureen! I'm excited to try this!! =D

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    1. I loved this from the first time you showed it (plus the bag too). I definitely want to have a go - I love the Autumnal look of this particular quilt you have created. So pretty but I have a thousand colour ways dancing around in my head. I simply must try it. Thanks for your generosity in sharing your lovely creations.

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  2. This is beautiful...thanks for the tutorial!

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  3. This is awesome! I'm always on the lookout for a good QAYG project to FINALLY tackle a bed-sized quilt. Thank you so much!

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    1. Thank you, Heather!! It was a ton of work to put together, so I really appreciate that you took the time to comment to let me know you like it! :)

      Be sure to share a photo of your quilt with me, I'd love to see it!!

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  4. That looks so pretty. Thanks for the tutorial.

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  5. This is awesome! Thank you so much for sharing and inspiring. On my to do list, credit to you!

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  6. Thank you - I'm printing if off now. I'm really anxious to try the QAYG, but I'll probably try something much smaller first. Thanks again!

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    1. Thanks Gayle! That makes me so happy -- these tutorials take me awhile to write, and after such a busy weekend, I stayed up pretty late putting it together in time to share this morning. Reading that you appreciate it makes it all worth it!! Thanks again!

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  7. Great tutorial and a beautiful quilt ... love it and definitely want to try this! You're awesome!

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    1. Thank you, Jane! I'm beginning a new one using all blues, to see how it looks using different color options. I'll be sharing that one soon!!

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    2. I'm excited to see that! I love seeing how different a single pattern can look by using different fabrics. I'm also excited to give this a try -- thank you for the tutorial.

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    3. That's Laurel! Yes, I think an Indigo version and then maybe a rainbow version will have to be made sooner than later! :)

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  8. ABSOLUTELY BEAUTIFUL!! My favorite!! THanks so much for the tutorial! That is the best one I've seen so far for the Herringbone pattern..and looks to be the best and easiest way too!!! THanks again!! and wonderful job as alway!

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  9. This is so intriguing! You did a great job with the tutorial. I might just have to try this!!

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  10. Thank you for such a great project to try! I much prefer this panel method rather than making "blocks". It really works with the herringbone pattern and looks like it would work great even without adding the strips at an angle. Could the strips just be added straight going down the panels, instead of at an angle?

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    1. Thank you, Catherine! Yes, adding the strips traveling straight down the panels would work great and would eliminate those little triangle scraps the herringbone pattern creates. But I SO love that herringbone design, those little scraps are a small sacrifice! :) Adding them straight would definitely make for a quick and easy, stacked strip quilt. Great idea!!

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  11. This looks like great fun - thanks for another terrific how-to, Maureen!

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  12. Fabulous! I have saved this tutorial for later use.

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  13. You are absolutely awesome! I am going to give this a try! It's gorgeous! Thanks for sharing!

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  14. this is such a great idea Maureen! I know I'm going to use this tutorial yet!

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  15. This looks fun! It looks like a great way to use all the pieces of batting that I have leftover from other projects. Thanks for sharing your techniques

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  16. Maureen you are so kind and generous to all of us; your tuts are the best by far! Thank you so much, your quilt is fabulous!

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  17. Genius!! A beautifully described process and easy-to-follow tute, can't wait to try it myself!! Have created string quilts with phone book paper and done QAYG with long sections joined so will feel right at home doing your technique - thanks for sharing Maureen!

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  18. Thank you SO MUCH for sharing the Tutorial! I love your quilt and I cannot wait to make one. thanks!!!

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  19. Love your detailed instructions and pictures. This is definitely a do for me. I will probably cut up the men's shirts I have for a quilt for my oldest daughter's partner. He wants a 'manly' quilt.

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  20. What a wonderful tutorial---I am going to start working on this TODAY---you work magic with your fabrics and detailed tutorials, girl. Thank you. :)

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  21. Yeah! This is great. I can't wait to get my scraps together and work on this lovely quilt! Thanks for sharing your work with us. :)

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  22. Maureen! You're a genius! : ) I recently made a herringbone quilt and it was SUCH. A. PAIN. Your method is way, way better! Definitely doing this with my scraps.

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    1. Thank you, Lee!! HUGE compliment coming from you!! :)

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  23. Thanks for sharing this..it looks like so much fun!

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  24. Love this quilt! Thanks for sharing the tutorial.

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  25. Love it.... I had decided Quilting might not be for me, my body want take it. I joined the Crazy and Twisted Group and I should have done this but mailing day is today....... Thanks

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  26. Thank you for the tutorial .. you are so awesome !! I never thinking that you put batting panel before... ooh.. this is neat...

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    1. Yes, I love the batting as foundation idea! I think string pieced blocks work best with a foundation -- paper or another kind of stabilizer. This batting method makes for very fast and happy results!

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  27. Thank you so much for the tutorial! Your attention to details is perfect! The second I saw your post on this quilt I knew I needed to re-create it! Quick question the fabric that you show in the above pics for the backing...What fabric is that? Love it!

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    1. Thank you, Tammy! It's one of Anna Maria's Folksy Flannel prints. It's so super soft! I've been under this quilt every evening since before I even had a chance to add the binding. Penny & I love it!

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  28. Okay.. This is brilliant, Maureen! Thank you so much!!

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  29. AWESOME!!! Thank you for taking the time to make this tutorial...its wonderful.

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    1. You should come over this week, so we can make one together! The more I look at the fabrics we pulled for yours, the more I love it!! :)

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  30. Maureen this is amazing! Thanks for taking the time to share your process :-)

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  31. Thanks Maureen for your inspiration once again. I just decided this morning that I will make this quilt for my son for Xmas. I haven't been able to settle on a pattern & time is running out. I follow you everyday & you continue to amaze me. Your tutorials are easy to understand so keep them coming. Thanks again.

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  32. I am definitely going to make this - such an awesome way to use all of your AMH fabrics together! I just might have to do the same thing!

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  33. Thanks so much for sharing this tutorial! This is my kind of quilt. It's on my to quilt list!

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  34. Question. On step 11 the herringbone points match, but on Step 11 and 14 they don't. Are they supposed to match or not. If all of the strips are the same width, it seems like they should match.
    Also- could you quickly describe how the quilt would be finished if the backing was also added to the batting strips. Thanks!

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    1. My goal was not to make my points match perfectly. So, sometimes they do and sometimes they don't. On a few panels I added strips that were a little too short in length, so I trimmed away the access to just where my batting was covered. If you made certain you only used strips measuring 2.5 in width and was careful to keep that precise 1/4" seam allowance throughout, then the points would match up perfectly for you.

      As far as the qayg method for adding the backing to the batting strips -- I've never tried that and don't plan to since I am so happy doing it this way. I know Pat Bravo has a wonderful quilt-as-you-go pattern using that method here -- http://www.patbravo.com/Pattern_Nouvelle.html

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    2. Thanks for the explanation. I agree they look fine not matching--just wondered.

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    3. You're welcome! If I were making this for a magazine or to have on display at a show, I would have made sure my points met perfectly. For this I just wanted to have fun, not stress, make a beautiful quilt, and then share the method. I think next time I'll take my time and will try to be a little more precise with each step! :)

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    4. I think this would look really good with varied width strips as well - thus eliminating the points matching problem.

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    5. Wondering how this would look with various strip widths, thus eliminating the "matching" issue. Would give it a whole new look!

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  35. In my comment I meant to say that on Step 12 and 14 they don't match. (typo)
    Also if you look at the photos you can see that they don't always match.

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  36. I love it! I think I'm going to try it on a smaller scale so I can test myself.

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  37. Absolutely gorgeous!!!! I love the backing material. I will add this tutorial to my favorites and will share it with my friends. Your work and creativity never disappoints!!

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  38. Thank you for such a lovely tutorial ~ it looks so much easier than I thought it would be! Can't wait to try it!

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  39. This such a beautiful quilt and such well written tutorial! I don't know how you do it all, but you are such an inspiration to me! Bravo! :)
    I shared this with my new western NY Modern Quilt Guild too!
    Thank you for a great tutorial.

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  40. I can't wait to try your QAYG method. You make it look so easy!

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  41. Lovely. Your tutorials always make me believe that "I CAN DO THAT". I have never tried a herringbone pattern because I am no good at "precise", but I may try this one. I love it. Thanks for all the hard work and late nights you put in for us, Maureen.

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  42. Maaavvvaaalous Dahling! Thanks for the GREAT tutorial. I can't wait to give this one a whirl. It looks amazing!

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  43. thanks for the tutorial!
    This is pretty much how I planned to do my chevron, but I wasn't going to foundation piece it. This seems to work well, so I will have to try it.

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  44. thank you for the tutorial. I will definitely keep this in mind for my scraps.

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  45. Can't wait to try this !!!! Quilt As You Go is the method I'm going back to (I started quilting with QAYG back in the 1980"s with the original Quilt As You Go gal Georgia Bonsteel ). I'm a physical therapist with 33 years of lifting people reeking havoc on both of my shoulders, so quilting a full size quilt is pretty much out of the question anymore. Thanks for this great tutorial !!!!!

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  46. Thank you sooooo much for this great tutorial Maureen!!!!!
    Dany

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  47. Thank you for this wonderful tutorial! It's such a beautiful quilt and it seems very doable, due to your great instructions.

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    1. You're welcome!! I do enjoy writing tutorials, even though they seem to take me forever! It means a lot that you, and so many others, appreciate it!!

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  48. Thank you for taking the time to put together this tutorial. I love your blog and have been fascinated by your quilt as you go techniques. And making a scrappy strip quilt has been on my 'want to do' list forever. This looks great!

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  49. Fabulous tutorial Maureen! Thank you for taking the time to show us a quick and easy way to make such a beautiful quilt. I like your method better than using paper. Tearing off the paper is very time consuming when making anything larger than a mug rug. I'm definitely going to make a throw size using your QAYG method.

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  50. Wow! That is great! I am going to make one. You made it look sew easy ;-))) Mary

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  51. Thank you for this! Your quilt is so stunning!!!! I never thought this would be so easy to make! At least that's how you are making it look. Thanks!!

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    1. You're welcome, Cheryl! It was easy and fast!! Because I smoothed the strings as I pieced, I barely got up! :)

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  52. Thank you thank you thank you! I LOVE this quilt and am so excited to try this method - I have a very small throat space so sometimes quilting can be really difficult - this seems like such a great way to work around that! Thanks for all the time you spent putting this together :)

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  53. I am so excited that you shared this tutorial!

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  54. GORGEOUS Maureen! And an awesome tutorial as well. Thank you so much.

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  55. Maureen, this is so pretty. I have used QAYG on a small project. Your tutorial makes the bigger size look so doable that I just might give it a try. What a great way to use up all of those scraps.

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    1. Yes, Jerry! This is so doable -- I bet you'll be surprised if you do give it a go!

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  56. I'm so excited you posted the tutorial. Yea.... can't wait to make this. I think it is my favorite quilt to date I have ever seen.

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  57. I have never tried the QAYG method where you sew two sections that are already sew to batting together. Thanks so much for this tutorial which shows how to do that!

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  58. Love this!! I am going to do this. Thank you for the tutorial..

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  59. Another great QAYG tutorial Maureen! I am definitely going to give this one a go! I have a king size quilt to make so this looks totally manageable! I am looking forward to seeing you do one in all blues, I have been collecting fabric in gray, mint and cream which I would love to see in this design or low volume!

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  60. Thank you so much for sharing. Just found your blog today through Pinterest.

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  61. I really want to do this quilt. I haven't done very much quilting, though, and I'm a little confused about how the process from steps 6 to 7 works. Maybe when I get started it will make sense?

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    1. Patty, feel free to email me any specific questions you have, anytime!

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  62. Love love love this! Every QAYG that you post I tell myself I need to try, but this is definitely the one. Now to finish the quilt I'm working on so I can start one of these!

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  63. Thanks for the great tutorial. I don't have that many scraps yet but I'm anxious to give it a try so will have to cut up what I have and make a smaller version. :-)

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    1. You're welcome! If you don't want to wait until you collect enough scraps, a pre-cut Jelly Roll of a fabric collection you really love would be perfect for this! And, bonus, you don't have to do as much cutting!! :)

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  64. This is wonderful, thanks for sharing!

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  65. Maureen, thank you so much for doing the tutorial on your beautiful quilt! One day I'm going to get up enough nerve to delve into quilt making and I'm holding on to this one!!

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  66. Beautiful quilt and fantastic tutorial!!! Thank you for taking the time to do this... It is very much appreciated and I want to put it on my Quilt & Sew board on Pinterest for a future project!!

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  67. If I wanted to make a lap size quilt would one jelly roll do the job? Or let's say I wanted to use FQs, how many of those would I need for a lap quilt? An estimate would be very helpful, thanks!

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    1. Well, my quilt is a 62" square, so I think the easiest adjustment would be to simply add the 10" more to the length of each panel to make your quilt 62" x 72". For my quilt I used approximately 210 strips measuring 2.5" x 14.5." Adding 10" to each panel would mean that you would need about 7 more strips for each panel, multiplied by 8 panels = about 56 more strips. So, around 266 in total. :)

      Hope this helps!!
      -Maureen

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  68. I cannot tell you how excited I am to make a quilt like this!!!!

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  69. Love, love this. I think it might be the perfect thing for some charity quilts for our MQG. Is that okay?

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  70. Maureen this quilt is stunning!!! I have to try it soon. Thanks for posting it!

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  71. Thank you for such a thorough tutorial! I have a few to-do's on my list to get through first, but I think I know just the stack of fabrics for this one. I love this quilt : )

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  72. Thank you so much for this tutorial, Maureen! I can not wait to try it!!

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  73. I have to do this. And hopefully use this as an excuse to shop for some fabrics.Thank you so much for the tutorial Maureen. You are so creative.

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  74. I fell in love with this quilt when you first introduced the block. I have been trying to decide on a quilt pattern for my king sized bed and I think this has got to be it. I adore it above all others!!

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  75. Maureen! I love this quilt and your tutorial! It's like foundation paper piecing, you could call it batting piecing. Lol this quilt is moving to the top of my list! Thank you for the tutorial!

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  76. Your instructions are so great. I am so doing this one and will surely impress my sister who quilts!

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  77. Just want to thank you, Maureen, for writing and sharing this tutorial. I really appreciate it! Making a quilt in this style just got moved to the front of the list! Thanks again--I love it!

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    1. Awesome, Kathy, thank you! Be sure to share a photo of your quilt with me!! :)

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  78. Just want to thank you, Maureen, for writing and sharing this tutorial. I really appreciate it! Making a quilt in this style just got moved to the front of the list! Thanks again--I love it!

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  79. L.O.V.E. it! I have been looking over herringbone patterns recently and am really excited about this one. Love the look of more quilting on the front than on the back- and all done on a domestic machine! Fabulous!

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    1. Thank you so much!! You can make the quilt front as dense as you want, too. I've gone very dense on a few of my QAYG's and love the difference in feel on the front compared to the subtle back. They also wash up nicely, so no worries there!!

      Thanks again!

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  80. Thanks for the great tutorial!

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  81. I love this quilt, I have some fabric I think would be awesome prepared like this.

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  82. So gorgeous!!! I just used your QAYG method for the first time... on a bag, of course. ;)

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  83. Wow! Thanks for sharing! Did you make an additional quilt, just to break down these instructions for quilt/fabric lovers???? (If so, THANKS, again!)

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    1. You're welcome Barb! I was just very careful to take photos with each step, so I'd have what I would need for a thorough tutorial. I was really hoping this was going to turn out good, so I made sure I took LOTS of photos! :)

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  84. Great job, Maureen! I love all the bright, happy colors and patterns. I will definitely have to make one of these. I think it would be perfect for my son, with Eclectic Elements by Tim Holtz and maybe some batiks instead of the pink fabrics in the selection, or Road 15 by Sweetwater. Thanks for the great instructions. Love it!

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  85. Hello Maureen! I saw your pattern posted on Facebook by Janome and I had to check it out. It's a beautiful quilt and I'm anxious to make one. Maybe it's just me, but I'm a little confused on Step 7. In step 6, it appears you sew the first fabric string to the batting and fold it down or over to the right. In step 7, it says to continue sewing strips on the raw edge with right sides together but it appears the second strip was sewn to the finished edge on the first strip then folded up or to the left. I can see where every strip after that is sewn to the raw edge but I'm confused about that second strip. Can you explain? Thanks.

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    1. Hi Julie! I thought the photos showed clearly enough that the first strip is sewn down and folded over to the right side of the panel and from then on you sewing the fabrics down and folding them to the left, making your way down the panel. I will double check what I wrote for you! Thanks!!

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    2. Thanks for the tutorial, Maureen. This is a great solution for making bigger quilts on a small machine! I too was confused about step 7, but this helps to clarify. I was wondering if you are using the lines you drew on the batting strips simply as a guide to keep you on the right angle, since it seems in the pictures you are not using them as "stitching lines"? Thanks!

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  86. Wow...this is a stunning quilt! I bought the MC12000 in January and I've been taking classes learning how to embroider and quilt. I'm not up to a full size quilt yet. LOL! This is a wonderful tutorial, well written and the photos are fantastic. When I do get around to ever quilting a full size quilt this looks like the pattern to follow. PS - I can't wait to see a demo of the MC15000.

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    1. I know! just saw the MC1500 debut the other day -- it looks amazing! I would love to upgrade to that!!

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  87. I am going to do this quilt! I love the scrappy strips and the quilt as you go tutorial!

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  88. Thank you for the tutorial, you made it look so easy! Taking my first quilting class next week, I'm going to try and do this one.

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  89. Loved the tutorial! The first time I saw your quilt I fell in love with it. Thanks for sharing.

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  90. what kind of batting are you using I tried the recycled quilters dream and my machine does not want to move tried to eat it

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    1. Diana, I'm so sorry, but that will not work. Recycled Quilters Dream is made 100% from recycled plastic bottled. You won't be able to iron it at all. You have to use a 100% cotton, natural fiber batting for this project. I noted that above. Thanks! - Maureen

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  91. What a totally fun and wonderful quilt!!!! I love the scrappiness of it but also the ease of putting it together. I'm going to make one very soon. Smaller because it will be a Project Linus Blanket but some little kid will love it. Thanks so much for sharing this tutorial! AWESOME!!

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  92. Im not sure of i posted my question what brand of batting my machine
    Is eating mine

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    1. Recycled Quilters Dream won't work for this Diana. I recommend 100% cotton, such as Nature's Touch by Pellon available online or at JoAnn Fabrics.

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  93. I just love your quilt and thank you so much for the instructions, I would like to try one of these myself one day. I am new to quilting and just trying to find my way. so I am reading everything I can find. thank you again.

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  94. Love this!! Going to use these jelly rolls that I bought! Thanks for the great tutorial!

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  95. I love everything about this!!!

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  96. Love this!! A great idea and a great tutorial. Thank you for sharing!

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  97. this is gorgeous! dont know if this was already asked or not, but what is that backing fabric??

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  98. Planning to do this beautiful quilt for my FIRST quilting project. I have antique flour sacks that will be incorporated into the quilt. Can't wait to get started. Thank you for sharing the how to's!

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  99. me again, i noticed you did panels instead of rectangles on this one. was there a reason?
    love. this.

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  100. I love love this! I've done a lot of rag quilts and have been wanting to venture into other quilts. Think my first and atempt at log cabin got me frustrated with contrast and colors and then my sewing/cutting not as precise so squares looked a bit wonky. I saw this and felt much more at ease with it. I've done my first two panels and noticed they weren't matching and seen that someone else had asked. All I can say is thanks goodness I don't have to take that panel apart! Being so precise may be my downfall but I won't give up yet!

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  101. As far as quilts go, I've done rag quilts, many rag quilts. Been wanting to venture into others but my first attempt at a log cabin was leaving me frustrated with the whole contrast and color thing. Then there's the precise cutting and sewing....... I saw this and thought it would put some of my frustrations at rest. Did my first two panels and noticed they weren't matching up and seen someone else ask the question. All I can say is thank goodness I don't have to redo. I Thought I was being precise but alas apparently not...... But I'm not giving up!

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  102. SO excited by this tutorial!! I have been wanting to try QAYG... and I love the idea of these larger panels! (not to mention the chevron, which is just so great!)

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  103. Hi Maureen! I love the tutorial! I used it to make a herringbone mason jar cozy and tutorial!

    http://melissalovescolor.blogspot.com/2013/11/herringbone-mason-jar-cozy-tutorial.html

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  104. This quilt turned out soooo gorgeous! I've been looking for a herringbone pattern and I'll definitely be making this one! Thanks so much for taking the time to put this up!

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  105. You are a gift to us all.... thanks for the great "how to" here. I might try this.

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  106. Just bought my jellyrolls and can't wait to start this beautiful quilt.

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  107. Just saw a quilt using your tut on Quarer Incher! Great quilt. So glad she link your site. This is an awesome tut. Can hardly wait to try it. Thanks!

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  108. Amazing quilt, awesome tutorial. Found your blog on Quarter Incher and so glad I did :) Will definitely try this method soon!

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  109. OH, this is my kind of quilt and yes, I would like to stitch one. Have read your detailed tutorial from start to finish...thank you, thank you for sharing with us - you are a "jewel" in the patchwork world...keep sewing as you surely inspire this lady.

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  110. I loved making this quilt with my friend Jane. We gave it away...so now I'll have to one to keep!

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  111. I really enjoyed making this quilt with my friend Jane. Since we gave it away I'll have to make myself one!

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  112. I sure make this quilt to use a part of my stash. I hope it will as beautifull as yours.

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  113. Great tutorial!
    However, I'm a little confused by Step 7. It says "continue adding fabric strings, placing each new fabric string on top of the other, with right sides facing, matching up the raw edges" but it looks like rather than matching up raw edges, you're matching the raw edge of the new, to-be-added strip with the already sewn to the batting edge of the previous strip. Is that so, or am I seeing things? Thanks!

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  114. This is the BEST, love, love your tutorial!!!! Thank you SO MUCH for spending your precious time on making this available.

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  115. This is the BEST, love it, love it!!! Thank you SO MUCH for spending your precious time on making this available.

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  116. This has got to be the easiest QAYG, that I've ever come across! Thank you, so much for sharing your pattern! Not all of us can afford to buy these. And an original at that! Absolutely love it!!! My mind, is already picking out which fabrics, I want to use! lol Thank you and God bless!

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  117. I am so anxious for Spring; so I took all my scraps out, looking for all the blooming colors, and am making this quilt. I added a bit of green & brown, to give it more of a garden feel. My daughter will post a pic of finished quilt. You have given me inspiration on these dull, wintry days. Thank you.

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  118. So lovely!!! Thanks for the inspiration, I am bookmarking this to try!

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  119. I have never made anything the QAYG method, but having read your detailed instructions I cannot wait to get started. You really do give the best detailed instructions and accompanying photos. It's like having an expert by my side. Thank you.

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  120. Thanks for the great tutorial. I love your blog

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  121. Maureen I had made this quilt earlier and I had told you that my batting was going wonky and that someone said it was because the batting was not needle punched. I want to do another . Do you think if I used a muslin panels to attach the strips first and then go with batting etc I would conquer that issue? Also I was thinking og attachne the panels using vertical strips. Do you think the herringbone effect will be spoilt by that?

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  122. OH MY! LOOK at all the colorful prints & floral fabrics for your LOVELY quilt. THANKS for sharing this tutorial... many many hours of work sewing. Sarah in Minneapolis

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  123. I love your quilt! But I have a question...

    Ok, so the only quilting that is done thru the batt and back is the quarter in from the seams?

    I have a longarm but would love to do one of these on my treadle :0)

    Thank you!!!! Amie Tarpley

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  124. Thank you for this!!! I am so excited to try it out. Thank you thank you thank you :D :D

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